You can change your patient's perspective in 2 important minutes

Anywhere opioids are present there may be a risk of opioid overdose.1-4 That’s why it’s important to have a conversation with your patients. In 2017, there were 47,600 deaths due to opioids.3 Additionally, most life-threatening opioid overdoses occur in the home, likely witnessed by friends or family.3,5

Make this 2-minute talk a key part of your protocol

In just a few minutes you can have an important discussion with your patients about risk factors associated with opioids and what they can do to be ready if an opioid overdose occurs. It may be a difficult conversation to have, but it can make all the difference.

Best practices to consider for having a 2-minute conversation with your patients

I want to take time today to chat about your opioid prescription. I prescribe you opioids because I know they are helping with your chronic pain. I also recognize that you have not had any issues taking them, which is great.

However, with opioids you can never rule out risk. That’s why it’s important that we always pay close attention to your health and safety.

1

Initiate the discussion

  • Provide your patient and their care partner with educational materials
  • Encourage your patient to always bring their care partner to appointments

We want to help you and those around you manage the risks. In addition to ensuring you take your opioid medication exactly as prescribed, I strongly suggest that you fill a prescription for take-home naloxone. Opioid medication may cause life-threatening opioid-related respiratory depression, which in essence means you are overdosing. Naloxone is used to counter the effects of opioid medication if there is slowed or stopped breathing.

That’s also why it’s so important that you keep it in an easily accessible place. Think of naloxone like the fire extinguisher you have in your house—there just in case you need it. Opioid-related respiratory depression can occur even if you take your medication exactly as prescribed.

2

Introduce take-home naloxone

  • Provide different ways to think about naloxone, like wearing a seatbelt, having a fire extinguisher or an insurance policy

Although there are different take-home naloxone options available, I prescribe EVZIO. EVZIO is designed to be easy to use. It has voice and visual guidance to help non-medically trained people administer naloxone during an opioid overdose. EVZIO is not a substitute for emergency medical care. It’s important to seek emergency medical attention after use.

Here is a Trainer for EVZIO. I want you to spend a couple of moments using it so you can see how it works and then we can discuss any questions you have. And remember to tell those around you that you have EVZIO and where you keep it, so they too can get to it quickly if needed.

EVZIO is an important part of my treatment protocol. We will ask you about your EVZIO prescription at every visit to ensure your prescription was filled and that you have it on hand.

3

Educate on EVZIO and the Trainer

  • Office staff should show patients how to use the Trainer for EVZIO, and provide them with educational materials
  • Document the conversation and make a note to discuss EVZIO with them at every appointment, and check to make sure their prescription is not expired

Help your patients be EVZIO-Ready

Seek emergency medical assistance immediately after use. The use of EVZIO may result in symptoms of acute opioid withdrawal.

References:

  1. EVZIO [prescribing information]. Richmond, VA: kaleo, Inc.; 2016.
  2. Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration. SAMHSA Opioid Overdose Prevention Toolkit. HHS Publication No. (SMA) 16-4742. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2018.
  3. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. CDC Wonder: About multiple causes of death, 1999-2017. http://wonder.cdc.gov/mcd-icd10.html. Accessed January 28, 2019.
  4. Federation of State Medical Boards. Guidelines for the chronic use of opioid analgesics. April 2017. https://www.fsmb.org/globalassets/advocacy/policies/opioid_guidelines_as_adopted_april-2017_final.pdf. Accessed January 25, 2019.
  5. Adams JM. Increasing naloxone awareness and use: The role of health care practitioners. JAMA. 2018;319(20):2073-2074.

INDICATION

EVZIO is an opioid antagonist indicated for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression in adults and pediatric patients. EVZIO is intended for immediate administration as emergency therapy in settings where opioids may be present. EVZIO is not a substitute for emergency medical care.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

EVZIO is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to naloxone hydrochloride or to any of the ingredients in EVZIO.

Seek emergency medical assistance immediately after use. Additional supportive and/or resuscitative measures may be helpful while awaiting emergency medical assistance.

The following warnings and precautions should be taken when administering EVZIO:

The following adverse reactions were most commonly observed in EVZIO clinical studies: dizziness and injection site erythema.

Abrupt reversal of opioid effects in persons who were physically dependent on opioids has precipitated signs and symptoms of opioid withdrawal including: body aches, fever, sweating, runny nose, sneezing, piloerection, yawning, weakness, shivering or trembling, nervousness, restlessness or irritability, diarrhea, nausea or vomiting, abdominal cramps, increased blood pressure, and tachycardia. In the neonate, opioid withdrawal signs and symptoms also included: convulsions, excessive crying, and hyperactive reflexes.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch or call 1-800-FDA-1088.

Please click for full Prescribing Information and Patient Information.

Indication

EVZIO is an opioid antagonist indicated for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression in adults and pediatric patients. EVZIO is intended for immediate administration as emergency therapy in settings where opioids may be present. EVZIO is not a substitute for emergency medical care.

Important Safety Information

EVZIO is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to naloxone hydrochloride or to any of the ingredients in EVZIO.

INDICATION

EVZIO is an opioid antagonist indicated for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression in adults and pediatric patients. EVZIO is intended for immediate administration as emergency therapy in settings where opioids may be present. EVZIO is not a substitute for emergency medical care.

Important Safety Information

EVZIO is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to naloxone hydrochloride or to any of the ingredients in EVZIO.

INDICATION

EVZIO is an opioid antagonist indicated for the emergency treatment of known or suspected opioid overdose, as manifested by respiratory and/or central nervous system depression in adults and pediatric patients. EVZIO is intended for immediate administration as emergency therapy in settings where opioids may be present. EVZIO is not a substitute for emergency medical care.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION

EVZIO is contraindicated in patients known to be hypersensitive to naloxone hydrochloride or to any of the ingredients in EVZIO.